Severe Weather — Fayetteville, NC-Summer 2012
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Straight-Line Winds

According to NOAA, damage from severe thunderstorm winds account for half of all severe reports in the lower 48 states and is more common than damage from tornadoes. Wind speeds can reach up to 100 mph and can produce a damage path extending for hundreds of miles. These winds are often called “straight-line” winds to differentiate the damage they cause from tornado damage. Damaging winds are classified as those exceeding 50 to 60 mph.

Since most thunderstorms produce some straight-line winds as a result of outflow generated by the thunderstorm downdraft, anyone living in thunderstorm-prone areas of the world is at risk for experiencing this phenomenon.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR HOME FROM WIND DAMAGE A Checklist for Homeowners

DO YOU KNOW YOUR RISK?

Ask your emergency management office or American Red Cross chapter for information about the hazards in your community.

DO YOU HAVE ENOUGH INSURANCE?

Even if you have taken steps to protect your home from flooding, you still need flood insurance if you live in a floodplain. Homeowners’ policies do not cover flood damage, so you will probably need to purchase a separate policy under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

It takes 30 days for a flood policy to take effect. This is why you need to purchase flood insurance before flooding occurs.

IS THE ROOF SHEATHING PROPERLY INSTALLED?

During a windstorm, wind forces are carried from the roof down to the exterior walls, down to the foundation. Homes can be damaged when wind forces are not properly transferred to the ground. Roof sheathing (the boards or plywood nailed to the roof rafters or trusses) can fail during a hurricane if not properly installed. Examine the sheathing from the attic. If many of the nails have missed the rafters, you may need to renail the sheathing. If you’re putting on a new roof, make sure the sheathing complies with current recommended practices.
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